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Defenders of Wildlife

Editorials and Opinion

 

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PD Editorial: Plan Bee to save the pollinators (Press Democrat [CA] , 05/26/15)
"Farmers and scientists have watched with alarm as honeybee colonies died off in recent years. Bees are pollinators, bringing color to backyard gardens and tending crops that feed the nation — almonds, avocados, apples, peaches, plums, pears, blueberries, strawberries, the list goes on....President Barack Obama offered a plan to expand breeding and feeding grounds for bees and other pollinators, including monarch butterflies, another species suffering sharp declines. Obama also directed the Environmental Protection Agency to re-evaluate the effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on honeybees. The agency has restricted their use around bee colonies, but, unlike the European Union, it hasn’t enacted a moratorium. ... It’s a cautious, science-based approach that deserves funding to expedite research and public cooperation in maintaining gardens and other spaces where bees and butterflies can thrive. Otherwise, some of our favorite foods may start disappearing from supermarket shelves and kitchen tables."

EDITORIAL: Our Views: Louisiana black bear makes remarkable turn exiting endangered species list (New Orleans Advocate, 05/25/15)
"One of our trademarks, the bear that inspired Teddy bears, is no longer an endangered species, according to federal authorities, although some longtime advocates for conservation dispute the decision of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service....As few as 100 bears are thought to have been living in the 1950s. We don’t want to go back to that level, but we are reasonably confident that the plans by federal and state authorities will not allow that to happen. This has been in discussion for a long time. Still, it’s good that the Black Bear Conservation Coalition and other environmental groups will keep a close eye on this new development.... Nor could it have happened without private citizens like Harold Schoeffler, whose legal action prompted the settlement that listed the bear as a threatened species in 1991. He’s not entirely happy with regulators now and will doubtless be heard on this new step."

EDITORIAL: The government’s Plan Bee (Washington Post, 05/21/15)
"A CRUCIAL agricultural workforce in the United States that produces some $15 billion worth of economic value every year, according to the Obama administration, has been struck by alarming losses recently, frightening advocates and demanding attention from Washington. Yes, the country’s bees are in trouble."

EDITORIAL: Our View: Let Ladder Ranch keep helping wolves (Santa Fe New Mexican, 05/18/15)
"For 17 years, Ted Turner’s Ladder Ranch in Sierra County has been a place where endangered Mexican gray wolves could find temporary refuge. Now, with a decision by the New Mexico Game and Fish Commission, that refuge is gone. On May 7, commissioners decided to deny a permit that would have continued to allow the ranch to provide pen space to wolves that either were being released into, or temporarily released from, the wild. The governor should reverse the commission’s denial. The re-introduction of the wolf to the wild needs as much support as possible ... Requiring the permits smacks of unnecessary government intrusion on the actions of a private landowner.... helping save the wolf is a much stronger position than helping allow a creature that so many love die out. By green-lighting the permit, Martinez has a chance to become a hero."

EDITORIAL: Bully for the black bear (News-Star [LA], 05/13/15)
"During the 1950s and ‘60s Louisiana black bears were on the brink of disappearing, with fewer than 100 remaining in a shrinking habitat. Officials enrolled Louisiana black bears in the Endangered Species Act program in 1992.... official announcement May 20 in Baton Rouge that the Louisiana black bear will be taken off the endangered list.... Barham can enjoy his sunset days as secretary knowing that he succeeded in his goal to assure Louisiana will continue to be home to the teddy bear. The recovery of the Louisiana black bear is an environmental achievement“ worthy of a hearty, “Bully.”"

Editorial: Game board unfairly takes aim at gray wolf protector  (Albuquerque Journal [NM], 05/12/15)
"Playing tit for tat with an endangered species is not only unproductive; it’s petty. Yet that appears to be what the New Mexico Game Commission did last week when it declined to renew a permit that had been in place for 17 years allowing Ted Turner’s Ladder Ranch in the Gila mountains to assist the federal Mexican gray wolf recovery program. Ever since the program began in 1998, the Turner ranch has worked with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to provide pen space for holding endangered wolves being taken from the wild or being reintroduced into the wilderness.... Landowner rights should not become as endangered as the wolf. Turner should be allowed to use his property as he wishes in cooperation with the federal government, and the commission shouldn’t flex its self-granted power to punish a private landowner to make a statement."

EDITORIAL: Preserving Virginia's 'Treasures' (News & Advance [Lynchburg, VA], 04/30/15)
"There’s much to love about the Old Dominion: its history, its heritage, its natural beauty. But with growth and progress, those natural treasures of the commonwealth come under increased pressure from development. That’s why an initiative Gov. Terry McAuliffe launched last week is so important. “Virginia Treasures” is designed to protect, in perpetuity, ecologically sensitive sites, lands that harbor endangered or threatened species .... The more of these “treasures” we can preserve and protect today, the more of the true Virginia we bequeath future generations."

Editorial: Protect rhinos and elephants (Bend Bulletin [OR], 04/29/15)
"Legislators in Oregon would like to ban sales of rhino horn and ivory in Oregon — similar to what has been done in New York and New Jersey. ... it could help, and the illegal ivory trade has no place in Oregon. Pass the bill."

Editorial: Spring marks the return of the osprey (Eagle-Tribune [MA], 04/21/15)
"One considered endangered, the osprey has made a solid, steady comeback locally. ...It wasn't until the United States outlawed DDT and similar pesticides that the bird began its comeback. Today, the osprey is both a conservation success story and a barometer of the health of the local ecosystem -- an actual canary in the coal mine. They sit at the top of the coastal food chain, so any poisons ingested by fish and other smaller animals eventually end up being part of the osprey diet. A healthy osprey population, therefore, is an indication of a generally healthy coastal ecosystem, which is a boon to humans as well."

EDITORIAL: Restoring delta must be part of tunnels plan (Fresno Bee [CA] , 04/20/15)
"U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said the plan would harm water quality and aquatic life, and increase pollution.... a focused, coordinated approach to restore habitat to help endangered and threatened species recover should be part of the governor’s new plan."

EDITORIAL: No Exemption For Ivory In Culpable Connecticut (Hartford Courant [CT], 04/19/15)
"Connecticut can make a down payment on the moral debt it owes the elephant by enacting an airtight ban on the sale of ivory."

EDITORIAL: Brown shouldn’t leave eco goals out of new Delta plan; Set metrics on restoration and start it now (Sacramento Bee [CA] , 04/19/15)
"The Bay Delta Conservation Plan was proposed with two equal goals: to reliably supply Southern Californians and Central Valley farmers with water, and to restore the Delta ecosystem to save endangered species, such as salmon and Delta smelt. ... a focused, coordinated approach to restore habitat to help endangered and threatened species recover should be part of the governor’s new plan.... the governor should specifically define the ecological goals, set measurable objectives for recovery of species, produce a coordinated action plan and strictly monitor its progress."

NWA Editorial: Cavefish help region develop the right way (Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette, 04/17/15)
"The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers the fish a threatened species.... cavefish are living barometers of the condition of the Northwest Arkansas water supply and how well we're taking care of it. In short, if the cave fish disappear, it means the region's water quality is on the decline. With all the development and population growth in Northwest Arkansas, the region's leaders must be continually concerned with protecting water supplies.... A recently released study suggests the Ozark cavefish and residential develop can co-exist .... the presence of the cavefish demonstrates the groundwater in the area is fairly high quality.... those pushing development cannot themselves be as blind as the cavefish when it comes to valuing protecting of the environment. This critical discussion must happen before irreparable harm is done.... Approaching it any other way would suggest the Ozark cavefish isn't the only creature that's blind."

Editorial: The Vanishing Pangolin (New York Times, 04/09/15)
"[H]uge numbers of wild creatures that most of the world has never even heard of are threatened with extinction by illegal trade .... Today it is a battle against a rapidly expanding demand for wild animals — dead and alive — that is spawning a global criminal network and threatening innumerable species with annihilation."

Editorial: The alarming decline of plant life (MetroWest Daily News [MA], 04/07/15)
"This past week, the New England Wildflower Society released a report stating that 22 percent of the plants it examined are either rare, in decline, endangered, or perhaps already extinct.... the consequences of a continued drop off in plant life could have profound implications for us."

Editorial: Ban ivory, rhino horn sales; Oregon can put pressure on poachers (Register Guard [OR], 04/07/15)
"Oregon can do its small but important part to shut down this trade by banning the sale of ivory and rhino horn."

RJ Editorial: Of bats and fungus (Record Journal [CT], 03/30/15)
"[B]ats play an important role in the ecological system, by pollinating flowers and spreading fruit seeds. Bat waste is so nutrient-rich, farmers use it to fertilize crops. Then bats protect those crops by gobbling up damage-causing insects. ... The fungal disease taking its toll on bats — known as white-nose syndrome — has prompted the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection to recommend placing the “endangered” tag on five of Connecticut’s eight native bat species. This should be done."

Editorial: The return of the Bald Eagle (Record Journal [CT], 03/23/15)
"Connecticut’s bald eagles are showing signs of adaptability ... If we take care of the Quinnipiac, perhaps their numbers will increase."

EDITORIAL: Manatees still warrant protections (Tampa Tribune [FL] , 03/23/15)
"The record number of manatees observed during the annual manatee count this year is no cause to diminish protections for the gentle seagoing mammal.... The counts are notoriously unreliable, with the weather determining how many manatees are spotted.... an unseasonably cold winter or a widespread red tide outbreak can quickly change the manatee’s prospects. ... So federal and state officials should be dubious about any attempt to slash manatee protections."

EDITORIAL: Struggling bees need allies beyond the almond industry (Fresno Bee [CA] , 03/21/15)
"Even amid crops that, unlike corn and soy, require bees for pollination, herbicides are wiping out the milkweed, mustard and other wild food that pollinators rely on. Meanwhile, systemic pesticides engineered into plants’ very seeds appear to be sickening bees and encouraging parasites and diseases. Bees are far from the only casualty; the situation has brought Monarch butterflies close to endangered species status.... The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is reviewing the safety of neonicotinoid pesticides, which appear to be impairing bee health"

EDITORIAL: More manatees at our shores; Thumbs up (Florida Today, 03/20/15)
"Given that 140 manatees have died in the Indian River Lagoon since 2012, for undetermined reasons, this is encouraging news. These marvelous marine mammals are welcomed here, whatever the weather."

Marin IJ Editorial: Expansion of marine sanctuaries a victory for the environment (Marin Independent Journal [CA], 03/19/15)
"Oil and gas exploration will now be banned not just off the Marin coast, in an area encompassing the Farallon Islands, but now also north along Sonoma and Mendocino counties’ coastlines to just above Point Arena. That protects a rich feeding area for 25 threatened and endangered species, including blue whales and humpback whales, northern fur seals and leatherback turtles. The area is home to a third of the world’s whales and dolphins, more than 163 species of birds and more than 300 species of fish."

EDITORIAL: Looking up: Math works for manatees (Northwest Florida Daily News, 03/19/15)
"State and Central Florida governments, including Volusia County, have responded to the Indian River Lagoon crisis by crafting new environmental policies designed to reduce the amount of chemicals flushed into area waterways and springs through stormwater runoff. A healthier lagoon and springs can only help the manatee population."

Editorial: Nature's best is in our own backyard (Victoria Advocate [TX], 03/18/15)
"In a USA Today reader's choice poll, the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge is among 20 contenders in the running to be named the Best National Wildlife Refuge in the country.... Today, visitors from throughout the world swoop into the Crossroads to see one of the refuge's focal points - the whooping crane. People can also visit Matagorda Island, which is part of the wildlife refuge and showcases Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtles and other species - both endangered and not.... It's not often we can say we have one of the nation's best, so let's embrace that."

End wait for strong plan to protect water quality: Editorial (Orlando Sentinel [FL] , 03/18/15)
"Discharges of water polluted by fertilizer and urban runoff from Lake Okeechobee have spawned toxic algae blooms in other waterways, with disastrous consequences. In 2013, scores of manatees and dolphins and hundreds of pelicans died in the Indian River Lagoon.... The Legislature needs to pass a strong bill — this year — to improve water quality. Floridians have waited too long."

EDITORIAL: Follow scientific process on threatened wildlife (Wichita Eagle [KS] , 03/13/15)
"Under threat of legislative intervention, and against the recommendation of species and habitat experts, the Kansas Wildlife, Parks and Tourism Commission voted last fall to remove the redbelly snake from the state’s threatened-species list. That only opened the door to more legislative meddling in what should be science-based decision making.... lawmakers should not compound the error by delisting the spotted skunk themselves."

EDITORIAL: Do not disturb; Sea turtle nesting season begins in Florida (Tampa Bay Newspapers [FL], 03/11/15)
"With Florida hosting one of the largest loggerhead nesting aggregations in the world, this becomes an opportunity for residents and visitors to play an important role in conserving these long-lived reptiles."